Wednesday, May 14, 2008

How Can Families Improve the Now and Future of Maids & Drivers in Saudi?

A few years back, my family and I went to Indonesia for the holidays. My dad saw to it that we experienced the rural villages, hills and farms of Indonesia rather than the polished up touristic sights. With the primitive beauty of the villages came the rubbing against people who previously worked or have relatives who work as maids and drivers in Saudi Arabia. Many of the villagers were not happy with us, to say the least. They gossiped about us while trying to sell us things. Whether we chose to buy or not, the unspoken curses chilled us at the spine; damn you and your riches!

In that environment my dread of having maids multiplied by the hundreds. The maids and drivers were no longer a minority, they were a majority. They became the owners of the land and my family became the visitor, vulnerable at any moment to receiving punishment for any Asian helper who was treated harshly in Saudi. Those who worked and were treated fairly are not expected to be grateful because they received money for services they provided. But what about
the mistreated? Anger speaks with such an infectious energy that it becomes the only voice audible.

Three years married, most of it in pursuit of education abroad, I have not yet settled in my natural habitat, an owned villa in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. In a couple of months, hubby and I will be returning home with a child. Going back, getting jobs and enrolling our child in school will naturally mean resuming our social role as a family that entertains relatives, in-laws and guests.

Beside the question of which job, preschool, furniture and car, there is the question about whether to hire a maid or not. With the amount of guests, dust, house size and the time spent at work, the answer is most probably yes; we will need help at home. If so,
what type of a maid should we hire? A fulltime (live in) or a part time (local)? Which nationality, age, religion?

From years of getting to know myself, I know two things: I cannot order people around, and I don’t feel comfortable living in the same house with a person who does not have the same rights I do. Having a maid could possibly weigh me with too much guilt that I begin to help the maid instead of accepting her help.


Choosing not to hire a maid will be a personal choice. However, if it were adopted by a large percentage of Saudis such a choice (might) not work for the (economic) benefit of countries which continue to export helpers. But are economic interests on the level of governments be sufficient enough reason for Saudi families to continue importing “Asian” helpers with a sound heart and conscience?

In accordance with the May 14th
Bloggers Unite for Human Rights, I would like to collaborate with you all in brain storming practical plans for improving the situation of maids and drivers in Saudi Arabia. Things that a common Saudi family can do to make the life of imported helpers better while they're in Saudi, and after they return home.

36 comments:

Culture Shock said...

Many people have to leave their homes ad families to find paying jobs to support their families. Foreign workers in Saudi Arabia sacrifice a lot for their families and I agree that their treatment by some Saudis is unfortunately disgusting. But that seems to be the only face, and our reputation seems to constantly be getting worse. What can we do?

I think there is a deep-seeded issue with the saudi mentality in this case. That of pride and "takabur" directed towards foreign workers albeit Indonesian, Philipino, Indian, Pakistani, you name it. This pride has caused a wide range hatred of us. It is very simillar to the pride that pervades American society, hence leading to some sectors of Islamic or Arab society to lash out against them. It is also simillar to the same pride that fueled the Atlantic Slave Trade. I think the first steps involves realizing how we are acting and being more scrutinous of our own thoughts and prejudices here.
From here, i think there will stem change, and things like religious freedom for ALL, and even simple things like DAYS OFF would be respected.

Aysha said...

Culture Shock,
Thank you very much for your valuable input. With your response to "How can families improve the now and future of maids and drivers in Saudi?" I'll start the counter:

1- Realizing how we are acting and being more scrutinous of our own thoughts and prejudices.
2- Religious freedom for ALL.
3- DAYS OFF.

Aysha said...

My own thoughts:
4- Communicating clear work schedules. When the work day starts, when it ends.
5- Communicating clear rates/bonuses for after hour work.
6- Communicating and providing clear written work description to the maid/driver upon arrival, using an interpretor when necessary.

Aysha said...

7- Encouraging the maid/driver to communicate their future goal.
8- Encourage the maid/driver to partake self development courses *not necessarily religion courses! This may be an exit in case families wish to give their maids a day off, while the maid has nowhere in particular to go to.

Saudi in US said...

Aysha,

I agree that we need to do a lot in Saudi to improve the life of domestic workers. I am glad your question was specific about what can be done by an average family rather than the entire society. I think the later is a very difficult issue to solve. Here are my thoughts:

- Parents should take leadership to teach other members of the family about respect for other nationalities. I think the prejudice issue is a huge problem in Saudi.
- There should be a good understanding among all members that a domestic worker is a wage earner doing a job and should be respected as a person.
- Every family should have rules drawn regarding what is expected from their domestics. This should include work hrs, duties, day of rest, etc. I have seen a 10 year old in Saudi call the house maid across the house to get him a glass of water. I say the parents need to slap the kid on his lazy ass and make him walk a few steps to get his own. The recognition that the maid is there to perform certain duties is important.
- Pay your workers on time. This is a common problem. The workers come to Saudi because they have families to support and timely payment is a requirement.
-Provide a room or space where the maid can have privacy. I know this is not a problem in some households, but I have seen many situations where maids slept in general areas like a dinning room and never had a place of privacy. If u can not afford the extra room, then you can not afford the maid.

Saudi Stepford Wife-Daisy said...

Subhanullah, this topic was just going through my head since we have a co-workers maid staying with us for a few days while they travel. I've thought seriously about supporting already established groups within embassies that advocate for workers rights. Some of the changes I'd like to see are:

-Laws enacted and violators prosecuted (regardless of wasta)which protect the workers right to fair and Islamic treatment.

- contracts signed by the employer understanding the rights of the worker prior to their departure from their home country.

- workers being informed of THEIR rights prior to leaving their country including contingency plans in the case of worker abuse.

-and this is the one I'd love to see the most... periodic follow-up calls/visits from a policing agency in the workers own language to discern the quality of employment and that their rights are being met. Many are denied access to telephones and are otherwise unable to contact authorities in case there is trouble.A simple call to the worker in his/her place of employment could prevent a lot of abuse.

The last one is the most feasible option and could be implemented as part of individual embassies citizen services. Labor wages sent home from abroad provide a crucial economic infusion for many of these countries and they should be more interested in protecting their investments.

(PS...you'll definately need a maid, I'm miserable these days without one.)

May said...

Coming from a very similar background, i've long decided not to ever have a maid. People tell me i'm unrealistic, but i still hope i don't have to.

Greta post - i hope it helps people to realise maids and drivers are humans too and make better choices on how they treat them.

Bob said...

I know a few Bangladeshis who worked in KSA and they all dislike Saudis. Each one of them is responsible for telling hundred more about how rotten the Saudis are. It really is bad PR.

Get a part-time house cleaner.

أبو سنان said...

I think the issue is more fundamental. Like "Saudi in the USA" said, it is good that you have talked about what Saudis can do on a micro level, but what about the society?

People can, and do, live very similar lives all around the world without the help of domestic help. Somehow, just somehow, they manage to get by. Keep in mind that the average American works the kind of hours that would be extreme in Saudi.

Even the moderately wealthy here in the USA seldom have maids even though they might have a 6,000 SF house, parties and guests all of the time and children. When they do, they often come once a week for a few hours, that is it.

It works, I think, because for most Westerners there is not an idea that certain types of work is meant for certain types/races of people.

My step son has been back in Saudi for 6 months now with his family. He just turned 17 so we thought it good that he get a job to help learn worth ethic, the value of money and hard work.

His father's family in Saudi objected that because he didnt have his education yet he couldnt get a job that "was fit for a Saudi".

So working at a front desk, with his English skills, isnt fit work. Neither is bagging groceries at a store. This and the kid has no work experience and no education, yet that is still seen to be work that no Saudi would really be fit for. Did they want a front desk office job with a pay packet of some 20,000 riyals a month?

This is the mind set that propells the maid culture that consumes Saudi today.

There are many poor Saudis who could use the money. Of course those Saudis employing them might have to come up with more than 1,500-2,000 riyals a month to pay for them, but at least the money would stay in Saudi.

This cannot happen because even the poorest of Saudis, with no education and no skills, are seen as being "too good" for this type of work.

There needs to be a change in Saudi where people realise that ALL work is honest, that there is not any job that is "too good" for a Saudi, and that they might have to actually do stuff for themselves.

We have four children and family where we live. They come to our place, we go to theirs. We have friends over, sometimes filling our place to capacity, yet we have NEVER needed a maid to do it.

We have done it together, yes a man doing chores around the house, as was the example of the Prophet and is actually Sunnah. I guess this is because we are hard workers and dont mind doing the stuff we do.

I have a degree, I have a professional job, yet I do not think I am too good to clean, do dishes or cook.

This is a VERY bad part of Saudi culture and causes issues at all levels in Saudi society, never mind the hatred that it helps engender against Saudis all over the world.

Eventually the oil will run out and like it or not Saudis will be forced to work, even manual labor and manufactoring jobs if they are not to sink back into the very poor nation that they used to be.

Countries like the UAE are thinking about this and will probably be hiring Saudi maids and drivers 150 years from now if the culture in Saudi doesnt change.

Culture Shock said...

I think it is important to remember that when a worker is abused, or is being abused, they probably will not tell an authority figure over the phone about it, with fear of retaliation. Also, any follow up will have to be made by the Saudi government to protect the foreign workers from unreasonable treatment simply because it is economic desparity from the foreign nationals country that causes them to come to Saudi Arabia. How many of these workers are even aware of rights, or will take the steps to enforce them if they were, with fear of retaliation. I think we all can understand how it feels, being a Saudi, travelling abroad, knowing we have rights as travellers or whatevers but trying to hide the passport in airports, etc. It is the same for foreigners in Saudi.
I think what was said about learning the value of work, realizing that work is not a bad thing, and simply getting off our behinds is the way to go as mentioned by AbuSnan. No one NEEDS a maid, it is a luxury, and maybe if we washed our own dishes, we wont cook so much, eat so much, and waste so many dishes washing them. Cooking could take an hour only instead of looking like an olympic event and our parties will become less extravagant. Drivers on the other hand is a different issue considering the particular situation of the lack of women driving. We have I feel a whole different set of issues to address here because we are dealing with different types of problems, a driver is given limited living space but it is usually seperate from the main house, he also sometimes doubles as the gardener and the guard. But basically his life sucks too, he is given no respect on the road, not by other drivers nor by his employer. He waits outside in a car for 5-6 hours while the wedding ends. If he is married, or unmarried as well, the man cant go on vacation for 2 years and cant see his wife, so you got all that sexual frustration which leads to all sorts of issues, but that also applies to maids. Basic humanity seems to be ignored and taken for granted. I have probably digressed from my original point, but all these thoughts and issues or so intertwined, but we must be made aware of all the difficulties that we face in order to bring about a change. And even then, it will never be perfect. There are simillar problems in many Western Countries in terms of immigration laws and immigrant rights from Canada to Australia. This is a pretty big collective issue and on this note, I am glad Saudis have not monopolized the rough treatment of "the Other".

American Bedu said...

Excellent post Aysha! If there were standard guidelines and regulations with a mechanism to enforce, that would be great. But what body in the Kingdom would be responsible as such? Who can really tell and monitor what goes on behind closed doors? And if a housemaid has a large extended family whom she is supporting will she in fact stand up and speak out if she is being ill treated and overworked?

I presently do not have a housemaid either full or part time. And like you mentioned in your post, the culture and traditions here are pushing me towards engaging one. Unlike the US where they are not as common, one must also take in to account the climate which further necessitates seeking help. Homes are generally bigger and more spacious than an average American home and 3/4 time of the year these homes need dusted, vacuumed and mopped each and every day due to the incessant sand that does not let up and makes its way everywhere...and if there is a sand storm, even the dishes in the cupboards will need washed thoroughly.

When I was using a p/t housemaid I had a schedule posted on the refridgerator door which identified expected tasks as well as hours and "red line" areas which would be cause for immediate dismissal (like letting someone in or "borrowing" items). I think these are processes which improve communications and understanding. Yes; one would hope to find a degree of loyalty from a housemaid or driver but don't forget, it has to be earned as well.

Regards,
American Bedu

Aysha said...

Culture shock, thank you for a wonderful summ up of the basic issues/conditions from which drivers and maids suffer in Saudi. These points can work as basis for our discussion of why families DO NEED to improve the now and then of drivers and maids.

Aysha said...

Saudi in US,

9- Parents should teach other members of the family: a) respect for other nationalities, b) that a domestic worker is a wage earner doing a job and should be respected as a person.

10- Families should have rules regarding what is expected from their domestics. This should include work hrs, duties, day of rest, etc. The recognition that the maid is there to perform certain duties is important.

11- Pay your workers on time. The workers come to Saudi because they have families to support and timely payment is a requirement.

12- Provide a room or space where the maid can have privacy. If u can not afford the extra room, then you can not afford the maid.

*Thanx for excellent points!

Aysha said...

Daisy,
You make excellent points, which tend to be more of a gov'tl duty. What I have in mind right now is 1) piling a list of can-do's by families, 2) discussing together ways in which those points can be publicized amidst families (raising public awareness) and put into actual practice, 3) If contacting embassies/employment offices seems applicable, we have to explore first what sort of regulations already exist, reasons behind why they have not been reinforced and ways through which we can suggest and deliver our suggestions.

*As for not having a helper with the kids, work, school, my heart goes out to you. You are a true hero-and even that is not saying enough.

Aysha said...

May, I might end up on the same side as you. So far, I feel more comfortable about having a part-timer every weekend. Glad to have you here!

Aysha said...

Bob, very true with the PR issue. Come to your other point *hands in the air, knees trembling* okay, okay, I'll get a part-time, I will! :D

Aysha said...

I'll be back.

Anonymous said...

hello aysha...

want to say احسن الله عزاءك في مثل هذا اليوم الحزين

and to tell u darling that my family did not have maids or drivers ever...

we ...the traditional biduin families do not have maids since we have the tradition of refusing strange women or man in the house

i feel the mass consuming life we have (now) in arabia is just disgusting

it is very newww....we did not have these malls and huge houses and the terrible showing off befroe 10 -20 years

i remeber my mom (may Allah bliss her and give her the strength)

she was telling me when I complain about daily chores: as long as I have the strength in my arms and legs, I wount bring a strange women that I know I wount welcome her or treat her like a daughter...

despite the fact that I was the last girl in the family ...with seven boys of different ages...mom could orgnize a lovley life of us...because she wanted to...

it is about the will aysha...some saudi's life now is dangerous..
they don't leave their lives..they don't cook thier food they don't do thier laundries ...

what is the meaning of a disgusting life like this?

it is natural to see the new generation of kids and lads without identity and aimless, fulling the streets of their car horns...

it is our falt aysha...it is the mothers falt...

if i had any authority I would do any thing to stop this ridiculous way of living



badryah al abdulrahman

Saudi Stepford Wife-Daisy said...

I gotta get this off my chest...
HAVING A MAID IS NOT necessarily A LUXURY HERE!
Not wanting to do one's own housework is usually not the issue for most people I know with maids. The problem comes in when a woman wants to fit in something OTHER than housework. Cleaning a Saudi home properly, even a smaller sized one like mine, is a marathon task and this is with average meals and no guests with a stay-at-home mom doing the work, even with some help from the kids. I never had problems maintaining a western home as well as work, study and take care of my children all on my own at the same time(my husband doesn't help either). As a woman with young children,I have forfeited a social life, anything other than absolutely necessary shopping trips, work, and don't even ask how my Master's dissertation is coming along since my maid left last October. Although laziness may be an issue for some of the upper-classes, for working class families or for a woman with young children, domestic help can be a necessity. And one cannot claim that only upper-class westerners are the only ones with maids. Services such as MollyMaid and MomsHelpers are in demand and I know of many women who moonlight as part-time housekeepers in middle-class America to help supplement their income.End OT Rant:)

the crazy jogger said...

LOL@ 2nd Para: tht must b a nightmare of an abusive employer!


Simple: Treat em like humans! Not some item with which u can mess around with n then replace if he/she leaves.
I used 2 know a saudi guy who was sick n tired of the maids n drivers he had while growin up He never got time w/ his parents. when lookin for a wife he made a point that he wont b having a maid or a driver, [so knw wht u'll b getting into, I guess]
and its also a social thing for some. like I've noticed that MOST lebanese ppl have maids.

Personally my parents n I have a houseboy who comes once or twice a week n cleans up. The rest of the days the siblings n I do it.
n there is no shame in it.. but saudi society thinks tht it is. [try cleaning your own car after a dust storm n listen to the calls]

Culture Shock said...

Saudi Stepford Wife,

You raise some very interesting points, and the issue I think is not having maids, is it even worth it if they are treated poorly, maybe everyone who is caught treating maids or drivers poorly, unreasonably, inhumanely, or any way they would not like to be treated, be banned from having them. Maybe that way we will appreciate their usefulness, and think twice about taking advantage of them. I guess a problem is that there seems to be an unlimited applicant pool that it is hard to appreciate them for the work they do and how much they help our lives. I feel for you.
Get your husband to help, you run this show sister :)

Hala said...

I say you can have a maid & driver, but just make sure you give them a decent place to live, a cell phone to call their families, some decent working hours & duties and one day off each week...Treat them as you treat any worker at any formal job and make sure they have their pay on time, they need jobs in our countries and we need help, so let's make a good deal with them...Good luck with your return and best of wishes in your plans...

Anonymous said...

I know there are NO one in the gulf will treat maids or drivers fairly...

it is that simple ...people in the gulf lack the sense of equality and tolarence between their each other...how about 'dirty stupid poor workers' from indonisia or where ever...?

this is the truth...

racism in Arabia and in the gulf is in the blood ...some times in the low...it is in the fabric of social discourse!

ther is no way of getting rid of it cos it is part of the discourse...

exactly like the american and the (war on terror)...

if we have an education that is devoted to plant equality and love and muslim brother hood and modesty, then we can have HOPE of people treating maids and drivers as human...

until that...just please have a look on one of the most popular suadi feminin forums (hawa world) and just observe how filthy and owful the way they are speaking about maids...

they don't consider them human...

and the stories about the fear of black magic or the fear from these maids having sexual relations with any man in the neighborhood..

and if I try to advise or clear that this is against islam and against morals I would be scolded and ignored or maybe i recieve mockery...

it is a terrible consuming immoral culture that was created in a critical moment of our history...


who are we now?
saudis?

muslims?

great sons and daughters of the desert and sun?

no way...

we don't know who r we now cos we lost every thing beautiful of us...

even our kindness and modesty replaced by filthy immoral showing off behaviours

nothing we can do more then EDUCATION EDUCATION EDUCATION....

badryah alabdulrahman

Ron Larson said...

I found it interesting that you mentioned "religion" as a criteria for a maid. Why? Who cares? You are hiring him/her for their skills. What they do in their private time, or what or how they choose to worship is none of your business. Are they a good person? Reliable? Do you get on well enough with them?

Anyhow, I think that little word you slipped into your post explained everything.

American_Bedu said...

Ron,

I'd at least like to take a stab on your comment on religion and why it may be important when engaging a housemaid or driver. In Saudi Arabia, islam is an integral way of life with shops and businesses and even schools closing five times a day for prayers. Also if one is not muslim, then they cannot enter Mecca or the holy parts of Medinah. For some families who routinely go to these places this can be a conflict. For example, my spouse's family is in Mecca and during the religious holidays everyone goes there to celebrate so we can number more than 200. All (who have them) bring their housemaids to assist. That's one small reason.

Another one is that some families practicing the muslim faith openly do not feel as comfortable with a non-muslim housemaid where food must be prepared in a halal manner, etc.

A muslim housemaid should also be more cognizant and accepting of the conservative lifestyle and practices in the Kingdom.

Those are just a few reasons which came to my mind.

Above being said, there are also many opportunities for non-muslim housemaids with muslim families and non-muslim families.

Think of it similar to when one may be choosing an au-pair in the West and determining appropriate age range, nationality, etc. One completes an extensive questionaire on preferences.

Best Regards,
American_Bedu
(maidless in Riyadh)

ChrisLA said...

Regarding servants, there is nothing wrong with that. What is wrong is treating them badly. If anyone feels so inferior that he/she must abusive toward a servant, or a waiter/waitress, or a clerk, the it reflects more on that person's problems than the relative status of the helper.

On a somewhat related topic, Aysha, have you thought about what books you will bring back with you to Saudi Arabia. As a student, you will be able to justify more books that the usual business traveler. There are so many books that one just can't get in Saudi Arabia, that this might be a great service you could do for your country. I could give you a starter list, but I think you already know my top ten.

Nouran said...

Very important post Aysha.
I just want to make your attention to a shok I have heard about it years ago !! How some guys think that they own maid, so he can force his maid to fuck him !!!!
Oh my god !!
Last year our new maid told us with tears about her previous "owner" and his disasters.
I couldn't believe :S

american bedu said...

Aysha,

I thought you would find this post in today's (21 May) Arab news of interest given the topic of your post:

http://www.arabnews.com/?page=1§ion=0&article=110110&d=21&m=5&y=2008

Aysha said...

I'm sorry for being late to respond. This week is my last to rewrite thesis and hand it in. Great input by EVERYONE.
I would like to draw your attention to the point that we're mainly discussing how to deal with the current situation of maids and drivers BEING in Saudi Arabia. Discussing how to do without them, will require seperate analysis and dsicussion-probably a very long time!

The link America Bedu provided gave me a heartache. Something about the process, and final sentence is terribly wrong.

By next week ISA I'll summ up the points you all made, and will open a new discussion post on how we can all protest for awareness and social-policing between families to guarantee better treatment and rights to maids and drivers, whether they work for us, or the family next door.

Anisah of South Dakota said...

Salam, I believe part of the problem is the issue of seperating husbands from their own wives. Far too many Gulf countries make it a requirement that the foreign laborers not be allowed to bring their spouses. This is soooo wrong on many levels, Islamically. I believe it would be wise to have a maid, since the issue of mere scope of the home is an issue. But be a responsible Muslim in hiring. Don't depend on the head-hunter agencies who are ripping off the laborers by over-charging them for their trip to the GULF. Saudis travel all the time to other regions. Take a trip to a selected country were you know there is a great economic hardship. For example... get a maid from Dharfar & sponsor her & her children to reside in the Kingdom! Make your action humanitarian as well as one of personal life style convenience. There are other areas too that suffer from humanitarian disasters, who now desperately need a home. You can learn also to appreciate their experiences & perhaps help their children by sponsoring them through school. Its time Muslims learn to be philanthropic with their money & less focused on their own dunya lifestyles.

Voice Of Truth said...

Someone did say to you a couple of years ago that you don't leave comment in any Saudi blog unless the Saudi blogger is a female who's being a critique of her society and I find that to be very true. A little google search confirmed that the above claim is very true. Eeven here in this very blog, you started to show up and reply only when the author of this blog, whose a saudi female, started to criticize her society!

You were also told that you are not telling the truth about who you are and that you are actually of a Middle Eastern origin. And that your mentality, your logic and the arguments you make are of someone who comes from a middle Eastern background and I also find that to be very true. Reading your reply here tells it all. Full of the usual stereotype about oil rich countries that you usually get from a middle easterner. And by the way, last time i had an oil change in saudi a saudi guy worked on my car.

also look at the following words by you lol :

'Countries like the UAE are thinking about this and will probably be hiring Saudi maids and drivers 150 years from now .'

lol this kind of thinking comes only from a hateful arab who is very familiar with hate discussions that takes place among some of the most stupid arabs sometimes(your women will be in our homes cleaning our bathrooms etc) such stuff does not come from a hateful whatever else you claim you are.

And what do you really know about uae to make such statement? you probably heard about Dubai and it's 'booming economy' but who onws those buinesses and what kind of work force do they have and even where do their customers come from? all foreign.

By the way, if all u.s citizens were hardworking men and women and don't mind doing whatever kind of job, then why do you have some twenty million illegal immigrants living there doing cheap labor, odd jobs, and farming? Not to mention, those who are legally there doing same kind of jobs when you have have millions of unemployed u.s citizens?

I am not trying to be anti U.S all that i am saying is, in every country in this world you will have a large number of the population who don't want to do cheap labor or real hard work such as farming. But your hate for saudi is blinding you. there must be a story behind all the hate you have been showing on the net since 2005.

sorry abo sinan, but are not just being critique of saudi or saudi society because you wish saudi all the best but rather, what you are doing mounts to hate.

It is sad that whenever saudis start some kind of constructive criticism of their country or their society weird personalities like you with their own agendas appear and start throwging their trash allover the place.

To Anonymous,

You are talking about the gulf only but please do search for what the UN agencies say about the treatment of foregin workers in Lebanon, Jordan, Lybia, Europe, The USA (specially the illeagle ones in the u.s and europe)Pakistan, and even India and how they treat Bangladeshi immmigrants.

Voice Of Truth said...

Abo Sinan,

Someone did say to you a couple of
years ago that you don't leave comment in any Saudi blog unless the Saudi blogger is a female who's being a critique of her society and I find that to be very true. A little google search confirmed that the above claim is very true. Eeven here in this very blog, you started to show up and reply only when the author of this blog, whose a saudi female, started to criticize her society!

You were also told that you are not telling the truth about who you are and that you are actually of a Middle Eastern origin. And that your mentality, your logic and the arguments you make are of someone who comes from a middle Eastern background and I also find that to be very true. Reading your reply here tells it all. Full of the usual stereotype about oil rich countries that you usually get from a middle easterner. And by the way, last time i had an oil change in saudi a saudi guy worked on my car.

also look at the following words by you lol :

'Countries like the UAE are thinking about this and will probably be hiring Saudi maids and drivers 150 years from now .'

lol this kind of thinking comes only from a hateful arab who is very familiar with hate discussions that takes place among some of the most stupid arabs sometimes(your women will be in our homes cleaning our bathrooms etc) such stuff does not come from a hateful whatever else you claim you are.

And what do you really know about uae to make such statement? you probably heard about Dubai and it's 'booming economy' but who onws those buinesses and what kind of work force do they have and even where do their customers come from? all foreign.

By the way, if all u.s citizens were hardworking men and women and don't mind doing whatever kind of job, then why do you have some twenty million illegal immigrants living there doing cheap labor, odd jobs, and farming? Not to mention, those who are legally there doing same kind of jobs when you have have millions of unemployed u.s citizens?

I am not trying to be anti U.S all that i am saying is, in every country in this world you will have a large number of the population who don't want to do cheap labor or real hard work such as farming. But your hate for saudi is blinding you. there must be a story behind all the hate you have been showing on the net since 2005.

sorry abo sinan, but are not just being critique of saudi or saudi society because you wish saudi all the best but rather, what you are doing mounts to hate.

It is sad that whenever saudis start some kind of constructive criticism of their country or their society weird personalities like you with their own agendas appear and start throwging their trash allover the place.

To Anonymous,

You are talking about the gulf only but please do search for what the UN agencies say about the treatment of foregin workers in Lebanon, Jordan, Lybia, Europe, The USA (specially the illeagle ones in the u.s and europe)Pakistan, and even India and how they treat Bangladeshi immmigrants

Susie of Arabia said...

Hi Aysha -
I wanted to say that I thought this was a great post and you got some really great comments and suggestions back.

To Voice of Truth -
When I read your attack on AbuSinan, I was floored. Many of the other commenters to this post were also critical of how badly some Saudis treat their hired help, yet you only chose to zero in on AbuSinan. Why?
The things you said about him are untrue. In fact, your very first sentence is a lie. Obviously you don't know anything about AbuSinan and for some reason you are very jealous of him or you have some kind of personality disorder. AbuSinan does not hate Saudis - he is married to one!
AbuSinan is right - there are many lower level jobs here that Saudis would not ever consider taking because it would be beneath him. Americans will accept any job if they have to in order to put food on the table.
I thought AbuSinan's remarks were insightful, helpful and said with respect and with class. Yours were not.

Anonymous said...

http://www.alwatan.com.sa/news/writerdetail.asp?issueno=2799&id=5905&Rname=37

Anonymous said...

By the way, if all u.s citizens were hardworking men and women and don't mind doing whatever kind of job, then why do you have some twenty million illegal immigrants living there doing cheap labor, odd jobs, and farming?

Because we have 20+ million low-wage immigrants driving down wages for unskilled jobs. If these jobs offered a fair wage (which they likely would without the importation of wage slaves) Americans would do them.

Not to mention, those who are legally there doing same kind of jobs when you have have millions of unemployed u.s citizens?

White Americans have a fairly strong work ethic, but black Americans do not. Offer welfare that provides the beginning of subsistence (easily supplemented by black market endeavors) and a large portion of the black American population will choose it, even without artificially depressed wages.

mansoor said...

Salam. iam mansoor indian origin now living house driver in saudi arabia Riyadh..
you may please to study living situation of house drivers. Employer giving a Room very small likly Dogs Huts. why ,Who (saudis)thinks who only a humonbeing..
Thanku for spending ur precious moments.
mansourpp@gmail.com